Ireland’s Sikhs to Plant 1,150 Trees in honour of Guru Nanak

Our friends at Eco-Sikh Ireland in partnership with ReforestNation will plant 1,150 trees as part of a nationwide initiative to plant over 1 million trees, in a bid to help reforest Ireland and combat climate change, global warming and bio-diversity loss.

The new micro-forest, the first of its kind in Ireland, will be named the Guru Nanak Sacred Forest – after the founder of the Sikh faith, Guru Nanak Dev Ji. 

Inspirational prayers will initiate proceedings, followed by tree planting demonstrations with Reforest Nation from 11am on Saturday 19th February at Templeglantine National School, Co. Limerick, where renowned Sikh scholar and historian Michael (Max) Arthur McAuliffe studied, to mark the official launch of the initiative.

Students from Templeglantine National School alongside a team of dedicated volunteers from Reforest Nation, as well as the local Sikh community, will be in attendance to plant saplings throughout the day. 

Also, the congregation from Guru Nanak Darbar Gurudwara will be travelling from Dublin, where the country’s only Sikh place of worship is located, to support the tree planting effort.

The Guru Nanak Sacred Forest Limerick is a collaborative project between Eco-Sikh Ireland, Reforest Nation and Templeglantine Community Development. It will cover an area of approximately 250 square meters, with over 1,150 trees of 11 different Irish native species.

Gearóid McEvoy, Founder of Reforest Nation says:

‘With the creation of Ireland’s first micro-forest at Templeglantine National School, I hope it will encourage more schools around Ireland and beyond to utilise their green spaces to help combat biodiversity loss and fight climate change.’ 

‘To safeguard our planet, it’s vital we inspire future generations to protect and restore the environment from a young age’

Dr Jagdeep Singh, a founding member from Eco-Sikh Ireland says:

‘As Sikhs, our connection to the environment is an integral part of our faith and identity. We hope this project inspires all communities in Ireland to lead on environmental stewardship and learn more about the endeavours of the Irish Sikh community.’ 

‘The forest will be the first of its kind in Ireland, and the 367th Guru Nanak Sacred Forest planted globally to date. I would like to thank Reforest Nation and the Templeglantine National School for their support throughout the planning process and look forward to the tree planting day’

Mr. Tadhg Mulcahy, spokesperson from Templeglantine Community Development and local historian says:

‘The planting of the Guru Nanak Sacred Forest in Templeglantine will be a wonderful way to commemorate the special relationship and heritage between the Sikh community and the place of Max McAuliffe’s childhood.’ 

‘It will also contribute to the enhancement of local biodiversity and provide a beautiful natural amenity for locals and visitors alike in the area to enjoy.’

The Guru Nanak Sacred Forest Limerick will be grown using a method of afforestation, where plant growth is 10 times faster and the resulting plantation is 30 times denser than usual. It will involve planting dozens of native species in the same area, without the use of chemicals or synthetic fertilizers, which will become self-sustaining after the first three years.

To volunteer or to take part tree planting visit www.ecosikhireland.wixsite.com/home. To support Reforest Nation visit www.reforestnation.ie and plant native trees from just €2.

Tree planting between 11am – 3pm, at Templeglantine National School, Co. Limerick

Complimentary refreshments available all day

Published by Ricky Panesar

PR & marketing guy, enthusiastic blogger...

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